Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Julie Bishop

China's tabloid media cycle spins on Raby v Bishop spat By Kirsty Needham16 May 2018 — 5:36pm Beijing: It was highly predictable that an outbreak of hostilities between foreign minister Julie Bishop and former ambassador Geoff Raby would receive prominent coverage a day later in China's tabloid Global Times newspaper. With a circulation of more than a million copies, Global Times devoted page three, and an editorial, to Raby's call for Bishop to be sacked as foreign minister in order to thaw the Australia-China relationship. It also covered Bishop's "strong response" to the "harsh accusation". Raby, the former ambassador to China, was "profoundly ignorant", Bishop said. Julie Bishop hits back at former Australian ambassador to China, Geoff Raby, who claimed that relations with Beijing can only improve with the foreign minister's sacking. Raby had slammed Bishop for not visiting China in two years and angering Beijing with "the most strident public comments on the South China Sea". Julie Bishop, whose ability to relate to China was called into question this week. Julie Bishop, whose ability to relate to China was called into question this week. An expert, Yu Lei from Sun Yatsen University, offered readers the sober analysis that Raby and Bishop had a different understanding of the situation because of their different personal experiences. Raby was a professional diplomat who had lived in China, and Bishop relied on written reports, the editorial said. It carried the headline: "Canberra's China policy justly under fire". Former Australian ambassador to China Geoff Raby. The incident, and the colourful language flying between Australia's top diplomat and the former ambassador turned Beijing business consultant, served as the latest platform for the Chinese newspaper to push its view that Canberra's relationship with China is "overwhelmed by distrust". The editorial rolled out a list of accusations: that Australia is tilting towards Washington and had become "a major force in smearing China"; "Australians advocating a friendly policy toward China are frequently vilified". It concluded: "Bishop and Turnbull are clear that damage to Sino-Australian ties isn't in the national interest, and perhaps that's why they rushed to oppose Geoff Raby's article." More than 2600 Chinese readers commented or forwarded comments on the article. Most were negative. Julie Bishop hits back at 'ignorant and ill-informed' criticism by former ambassador CHINA Julie Bishop hits back at 'ignorant and ill-informed' criticism by former ambassador Add to shortlist "I don't want to instigate hatred, but every Australian policy on China is not a strategic cooperation, but a strategic confrontation," wrote one commenter. "Like a koala's sharp claws, from time to time it wants to hurt people," wrote another. Billionaire iron ore magnate Andrew Forrest said on Tuesday that reading Australian media reports on China reprinted in Chinese media broke his heart. Australian diplomats in China are also regularly frustrated at how swiftly the Global Times repeats and amplifies to its readership the latest blow-ups in the Australian domestic debate over Chinese influence. Among those readers are likely to be China's foreign affairs community, because of the paper's focus on international news. Little goes unnoticed. A recent front page showed Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull astride a submarine with French President Emmanuel Macron. The caption on the picture: "France and Australia scheme to balance China". Mostly the news stories are "churned" directly from the websites of Australian media with close accuracy and an inflammatory headline. But Global Times editorials treat Australia as a regular whipping boy. There, we are on high rotation with India, Canada, the United States and other countries deemed that week to have insulted China's national dignity. Indian correspondents in Beijing have spoken of a similar cycle between local media reports and Global Times outrage, which is then followed by more local media reaction. The timing of Raby's call for Bishop's sacking, as Trade Minister Steven Ciobo was soon to touch down in Shanghai on Thursday for the first visit by a Turnbull Government minister to China this year, may have prompted the strong response from Bishop. This week, after all, was supposed to be about Australia's attempt to smooth the rocky relationship.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Allen Lew - CEO

To: 'helpdesk@relayservice.com.au' Cc: 'eddieh (eddieh@iinet.net.au)' eddieh@iinet.net.au Dear Mr. Lew, I will publish my complaint onto our website if still nothing done as I have contacted You and your Boogagoon Office a number of times. Yours respectfully Edward Hwang. Hon. President Unity Party WA info@unitywa.org Blogger:Bloger Dashboard Twitter.com/unitypartywa Ph/Fax: 61893681884 Protect environment-save trees-use Email. UPWA is the only political party that calls a spade a spade.

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Prince Charles!

Dear Editor, It will be a disaster if they appoint Prince Charles as the next king of UK because he doesn't care his young wife Diana died and married someone who devoiced her own husband to marry him. Prince Charles should follow his great uncle who refused to be the king of UK because he married the sea captain's wife and abdicated to France until he died there. Yours sincerely, Eddie Hwang. Prince Charles to be the next Commonwealth head Prince Charles to succeed his mother, Queen Elizabeth, who has been the head since 195 PUBLISHED : Saturday, 21 April, 2018, 1:42am Prince Charles speaks at the formal opening of the Commonwealth heads of government meeting at Buckingham Palace in London on Thursday. Photo: AFP Queen Elizabeth supports Prince Charles to follow her as Commonwealth head Speculation was rife at Bridal Fashion Week about what the princess-to-be might wear when she marries Prince Harry next month In this official photograph released by Buckingham Palace Wednesday April 20, 2016 to mark her 90th birthday, Queen Elizabeth is seen walking in the private grounds of Windsor Castle, in England, on steps at the rear of the East Terrace and East Garden with four of her dogs: clockwise from top left corgi Willow, dorgis Vulcan and Candy, and Holly a corgi. Photo: AP Queen Elizabeth listens during speeches in the picture gallery for the queen's dinner during the Commonwealth heads of government meeting at Buckingham Palace in London on Thursday. Photo: AFP There have been calls for the role to be rotated around the member states, but in recent days the queen, 91, the British government and other leaders have backed Charles, 69. The Commonwealth evolved out of the British Empire in the mid-20th century, and the queen has been its head since her reign began in 1952. Bridal designers talk princess moments and Meghan Markle Charles had long been expected to take on the role even though it is not strictly hereditary. Some people have suggested a non-royal leader would be more appropriate in the 21st century. The monarch – who turns 92 on Saturday – said Thursday that she hoped her son and heir would one day “carry on the important work started by my father in 1949.” Guests dine in the picture gallery at the queen's dinner during the Commonwealth heads of government meeting at Buckingham Palace in London on Thursday. Photo: Getty Images The British government backed Charles to succeed his mother, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he agreed “very much” with the queen’s wishes. The position is largely symbolic, but the queen’s commitment has been a major force behind the survival of the Commonwealth. She has visited almost every member country, often multiple times, over her 66-year reign. Charles is a long-time champion of environmental causes, a priority for the Commonwealth. Its members include small island nations in the Caribbean and Pacific that are among the countries most vulnerable to rising seas, fiercer storms and other effects of global climate change. Prince Charles speaks with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May before the queen's dinner during the Commonwealth heads of government meeting at Buckingham Palace in London on Thursday. Photo: AFP Protecting the world’s oceans is high on the agenda at the Commonwealth meeting, alongside issues such as cybersecurity and trade. Britain has tried to use the biennial heads of government meeting to reinvigorate the disparate group that has struggled to carve out a firm place on the world stage. The UK also wants to lay the groundwork for new trade deals with Commonwealth nations after Britain leaves the European Union next year. s

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Artificial rain

Dear Editor, China must be congratulated for making artificial rain which will benefits a large area Tibet and Xinjiang where there is hardly any rain during the year! Yours sincerely, Eddie Hwang. China to make it rain over area 3 times the size of Spain Published time: 8 Apr, 2018 08:19 Since 2013 China has been creating 55 billion tons of artificial rain a year. The country is now embarking on its biggest rainmaking project ever. In terms of the plan, announced this month, Chinese authorities intend to force rainfall and snow over 1.6 million sq km (620,000 sq miles), an area roughly three times the size of Spain. According to media reports, the government will use new military weather-altering technology developed by the state-owned China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. The country plans to build tens of thousands of combustion chambers on Tibetan mountainsides. The chambers will burn a solid fuel, which will result in a spray of silver iodide billowing towards the sky. ‘Hanging gardens’ of China? ‘Forest towers’ to tackle country’s pollution problem (PHOTO, VIDEO) https://on.rt.com/82oc “More than 500 burners have been deployed on alpine slopes in Tibet, Xinjiang and other areas for experimental use. The data we have collected show very promising results,” an unnamed researcher told the Morning Post. “Sometimes snow would start falling almost immediately after we ignited the chamber. It was like standing on the stage of a magic show,” he said The Tibetan plateau is vital to the water supply for much of China and a large area of Asia. Its glaciers and reservoirs feed the Yellow, Yangtze, Mekong, and other major rivers that flow through China, India, Nepal, and other countries. Sprayed from planes, the particles will provide something for passing water vapor to condense around, forming clouds. Those clouds will bring the rain. A single cloud-seeding chamber could create a strip of clouds covering a 5km area. Traditionally, the rainmaking process or “cloud-seeding” means rocket-launching chemicals into clouds which accelerate the creation of ice crystals that eventually become rain. China also uses military aircraft for those purposes. Rainmaking is also a popular way to “clean up” air in China, where heavy smog is a big problem for many cities. The practice of weather modification has become more frequent across the country in recent years, including for major public events. In 2008, China launched over 1,100 rockets containing silver iodide into Beijing's skies before the Olympics opening ceremony to disperse clouds and keep the Olympics rain-free. Beijing has a “development plan” for weather modification until 2020. artificial rain

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Racist Pauline Hanson

Dear Editor, Senator Pauline Hanson is lying when she disagrees with Indigenous Culture otherwise she would agree! Yours sincerely, Eddie Hwang. ‘Disgusting’: Pauline Hanson blasts Commonwealth Games ceremony’s focus on indigenous culture Claire Bickers, AAP | News Corp Australia Network April 6, 2018 10:37AM PAULINE Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony. In an extraordinary interview with Sky News, the One Nation leader also said she considered herself “indigenous” for simply being born in Australia. “I thought it was disgusting, absolutely disgusting,” she said when asked about Wednesday’s official opening on the Gold Coast this morning. 2018 Commonwealth Games: Medal Table, Event Schedule, Athlete Search and Latest news The ceremony had featured indigenous performers Mau Power, the first hip-hop artist to emerge out of the Torres Strait, and world-renowned didgeridoo player William Barton. Senator Hanson blasted the “20 minutes” devoted to indigenous culture, saying she couldn’t understand the rap song and most Australians didn’t listen to didgeridoo music. Pauline Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony. Pauline Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony.Picture: AAP “As far as I’m concerned, that is not Australia,” Senator Hanson said. “They (indigenous Australians) are part of the culture, the heritage of this country. “They are not what Australia is about.” Senator Hanson also slammed more general preferential treatment for indigenous Australians in society but denied her position was racist. “I have got nothing against the Aboriginal people but I’m sick and tired of being made to feel as if I’m a second-class citizen in my own country,” Senator Hanson told Sky News. “I’m indigenous as far as I’m concerned. “I was born here. This is my country as much as anyone else.” The senator said her criticism was “not racism”. Indigenous dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. Indigenous dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.Picture: Getty Images, Michael Dodge/Getty Images “I’m sick and tired of people having a go at me because ‘it’s racism’.” “We have a lot of racism going on in this country — blatant racism that you will get the assistance and help purely based on your race.” Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday advised Australians to ignore online trolls critising the ceremony. “Just don’t read it,” he told Channel Seven’s Sunrise program. “If you want to stay sane, don’t read all the negative stuff. “Social media is dominated by negativity ... particularly Twitter. So, stay sane, don’t read it.” Originally published as Pauline Hanson claims she is indigenous Eddie Hwang Hon. President Unity Party WA info@unitywa.org http://unitypartywa.wordpress.com (published) http://twitter.com/unitypartywa ( “ ) Ph/Fax: 61893681884 Protect environment-save trees-use Email. UPWA is the only political party that calls a spade a spade.

Racist Pauline Hanson

Dear Editor, Senator Pauline Hanson is lying when she disagrees with Indigenous Culture otherwise she would agree! Yours sincerely, Eddie Hwang. ‘Disgusting’: Pauline Hanson blasts Commonwealth Games ceremony’s focus on indigenous culture Claire Bickers, AAP | News Corp Australia Network April 6, 2018 10:37AM PAULINE Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony. In an extraordinary interview with Sky News, the One Nation leader also said she considered herself “indigenous” for simply being born in Australia. “I thought it was disgusting, absolutely disgusting,” she said when asked about Wednesday’s official opening on the Gold Coast this morning. 2018 Commonwealth Games: Medal Table, Event Schedule, Athlete Search and Latest news The ceremony had featured indigenous performers Mau Power, the first hip-hop artist to emerge out of the Torres Strait, and world-renowned didgeridoo player William Barton. Senator Hanson blasted the “20 minutes” devoted to indigenous culture, saying she couldn’t understand the rap song and most Australians didn’t listen to didgeridoo music. Pauline Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony. Pauline Hanson has denied she’s a racist after condemning the “disgusting” focus on Australia’s indigenous heritage at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony.Picture: AAP “As far as I’m concerned, that is not Australia,” Senator Hanson said. “They (indigenous Australians) are part of the culture, the heritage of this country. “They are not what Australia is about.” Senator Hanson also slammed more general preferential treatment for indigenous Australians in society but denied her position was racist. “I have got nothing against the Aboriginal people but I’m sick and tired of being made to feel as if I’m a second-class citizen in my own country,” Senator Hanson told Sky News. “I’m indigenous as far as I’m concerned. “I was born here. This is my country as much as anyone else.” The senator said her criticism was “not racism”. Indigenous dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. Indigenous dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.Picture: Getty Images, Michael Dodge/Getty Images “I’m sick and tired of people having a go at me because ‘it’s racism’.” “We have a lot of racism going on in this country — blatant racism that you will get the assistance and help purely based on your race.” Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday advised Australians to ignore online trolls critising the ceremony. “Just don’t read it,” he told Channel Seven’s Sunrise program. “If you want to stay sane, don’t read all the negative stuff. “Social media is dominated by negativity ... particularly Twitter. So, stay sane, don’t read it.” Originally published as Pauline Hanson claims she is indigenous Eddie Hwang Hon. President Unity Party WA info@unitywa.org http://unitypartywa.wordpress.com (published) http://twitter.com/unitypartywa ( “ ) Ph/Fax: 61893681884 Protect environment-save trees-use Email. UPWA is the only political party that calls a spade a spade.

Friday, February 23, 2018

Dear Prime Minister, Senator Joyce did the right thing by resigning from both positions as his baby is due in April, 2018! One should never has a sexsual relationship with a staff. Yours respectfully, Eddie Hwang Honurary President info@unitypartywa.org Phone: 93681884. Barnaby Joyce has stepped down as leader of the Nationals and Deputy Prime Minister. Deputy Prime Minister and Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce will step down from his posts on Monday. Mr Joyce, speaking at a press conference in the NSW town of Armidale, said the “cacophony” of allegations against him had to stop. He said it would be almost impossible for him to sit in the House of Representatives with the allegations including the latest claim of sexual harassment. “But it’s quite evident that you can’t go to the dispatch box while issues like that are surrounding you,” he said. “On Monday, at party room, I will step down as the leader of the National Party and Deputy Prime Minister.” “It will be a circuit breaker for my daughters, it will be a circuit breaker for Nat. It has got to stop.” Mr Joyce said over the past few weeks there had been a “litany” of allegations against him. “I don’t believe any of them have been sustained,” he said. Echoing former PM Tony Abbott, Mr Joyce said he would not undermine the Government while on the backbench. “I won’t snipe,” he said. Mr Joyce said with his baby to partner Vikki Campion due in April, he would be busy on the backbench. He said it was not a tough decision to step down. “At the end, no not hard at all,” he said. Trio in line for Nationals leadership The three men in line to replace Barnaby Joyce as Nationals leader include a gastroenterologist, a journalist and a rising star from the agriculture industry. The meteoric rise of David Littleproud could continue, with the Maranoa MP tipped by some to challenge strongly for the leadership. The 41-year-old Queenslander, who ran an agribusiness southwest of Brisbane, was only elected to parliament in 2016 and entered cabinet as Agriculture Minister just two months ago. His father Brian Littleproud was a long-time Queensland state MP and served as a minister. Another challenger, Michael McCormack, was editor of the Daily Advertiser in Wagga Wagga through the 1990s, before entering parliament in 2010. He has been touted as a potential leader, but suffered through a difficult interview on Sky News this week where he repeatedly refused to back his boss. The Veterans Affairs Minister also didn't rule out running for the leadership. "It's a very hypothetical question, we'll just have to see what happens in the future," he said earlier this week. David Gillespie was a gastroenterologist for 20 years before he entered parliament in 2013 as member for Lyne. He was appointed Assistant Minister for Rural Health in 2016, before becoming Assistant Minister for Health, and now Assistant Minister for Children and Families. Dr Gillespie faces a High Court challenge over his ownership, at the time of election, of a small suburban shopping complex which has an Australia Post franchise. He could be rendered ineligible to sit in parliament if the court finds he has an indirect financial benefit in the commonwealth. Former Infrastructure Minister Darren Chester was dumped to the back bench in December and is considered unlikely to win votes in a leadership spill. Nationals deputy leader Bridget McKenzie is Victorian and a senator, so is also unlikely to be considered. Mr Joyce has declined to publicly back any successor.